Montana Outdoors

April 30, 2012

And more April flowers

This is appearing to be an unusual spring for wildflowers. Some seem to be blooming later than normal and some seem to be early. In this and the following post I will show the rest of this year’s April blooms that I’ve encountered.

Stream Violet, Wood Violet

Stream Violet, Wood Violet, Viola glabella

Stream Violet, Wood Violet

Stream Violet, Wood Violet, Viola glabella

Redstem Stork's Bill

Redstem Stork’s Bill, Erodium cicutarium

Redstem Stork's Bill

Redstem Stork’s Bill, Erodium cicutarium

Utah Honeysuckle, Red Twinberry

Utah Honeysuckle, Red Twinberry, Lonicera utahensis

Utah Honeysuckle, Red Twinberry

Utah Honeysuckle, Red Twinberry, Lonicera utahensis

Falsebox, Mountain Boxwood, Oregon Boxwood

Falsebox, Mountain Boxwood, Oregon Boxwood, Pachistima (or Paxistima) myrsinites

Common Dandelion

Common Dandelion, Taraxacum officinale

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35 Comments »

  1. These are so beautiful – such intense, vibrant colours. I love your photos!

    Like

    Comment by Jo Woolf — May 1, 2012 @ 4:05 am

  2. Wonderful pictures – especially the single redstem storks bill. I’d be interested to know how it got its name.

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    Comment by Finn Holding — May 1, 2012 @ 4:47 am

    • Thanks Finn. The fruit of the stork’s bill are capsules with long beaks, shaped like a stork’s or crane’s bill. Actually, a more correct name might be “heron’s bill” because the genus name erodium is from eriodios, the Greek name for a heron.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 1, 2012 @ 10:14 pm

  3. These are wonderful. The false boxwood and the Utah honeysuckle are especially appealing to me. They’re exquisite.

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    Comment by Teresa Evangeline — May 1, 2012 @ 4:58 am

    • The boxwood blossom is very tiny and easily overlooked, but such a different blossom! Both the boxwood and the honeysuckle are shrubs. The boxwood grows up to two feet tall, although the blossoms are very small. The honeysuckle is quite bushy and will get to 6 feet tall.

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      Comment by montucky — May 1, 2012 @ 10:21 pm

  4. Very nice flower photos. I know only the first and the last though.. the rest of them do not grow around my place, but nice to see of course!

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    Comment by bentehaarstad — May 1, 2012 @ 5:05 am

  5. I like every single flower. We have something similar to the stork’s bill, but it is not called that.

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    Comment by sandy — May 1, 2012 @ 5:15 am

    • I just encountered the Stork’s bill blooming in an array the other day. Before that all I ever saw was single blossoms, very tiny and very low to the ground.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 1, 2012 @ 10:40 pm

  6. They’re gorgeous! Even the ordinary dandelion is rendered extraordinary thru your camera’s lens.

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    Comment by Marcie — May 1, 2012 @ 6:01 am

    • I don’t always like the dandelion plant itself, but I do think the blossoms are pretty. They are growing in profusion this year too and there are large fields around that are all yellow.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 1, 2012 @ 10:42 pm

  7. I love the color of those stork’s bills. I just read that they grow in every state except Florida and Louisiana, but I don’t think I’ve seen them here. It could be the acid soil we have-I also read that they like alkaline or neutral soil. I’ll have to keep a lookout for them.

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    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — May 1, 2012 @ 7:52 am

    • They are a pretty color. Yes, they seem to like an alkaline soil as ours is right here. That probably keeps them out of the forests.

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      Comment by montucky — May 1, 2012 @ 10:44 pm

  8. interesting how some are early others late. I think I like the stork’s bill and the falsebox.

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    Comment by skouba — May 1, 2012 @ 8:15 am

    • Very surprising year. I saw a plant in bloom today that really surprised me: it’s about a month early. Both of those are very tiny, but they have great colors!

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      Comment by montucky — May 1, 2012 @ 10:46 pm

  9. They are gorgeous, for sure! Love the violets!

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    Comment by allbymyself09 — May 1, 2012 @ 11:22 am

    • The violets were a surprise to me because they were blooming at about 4200 feet; very early for up there. In fact there were snowflakes in the air as I photographed them.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 1, 2012 @ 10:47 pm

  10. Oh, honeysuckle! My favorite. Love the smell of them. They make me think of spring/summer and my childhood neighbor’s home where the honeysuckle grew up lattice around her back porch.

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    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — May 1, 2012 @ 3:16 pm

    • We have another honeysuckle here, an orange one that is quite large and very fragrant. It blooms later in the summer. We have a domestic one growing by our house and it’s putting out leaves, but no blossoms yet.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 1, 2012 @ 10:49 pm

  11. So much detail that I wasn’t aware of in those little yellow violets!

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    Comment by Kim — May 1, 2012 @ 7:39 pm

    • The texture in the petals of one seems unusual, but I think perhaps it’s because it was soaked by a good rain during the night.

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      Comment by montucky — May 1, 2012 @ 10:50 pm

  12. The boxwood flowers are nothing short of amazing. Actually they all are, including the lowly dandelion.

    Like

    Comment by jomegat — May 1, 2012 @ 10:04 pm

    • I think that’s why they hold such a fascination for me. And incredibly, I still keep encountering ones that are new to me. I’m afraid that to find them all, one would have to be in the outdoors all of the time (which is something that I do aspire to).

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 1, 2012 @ 10:53 pm

  13. If jewelry designers were smart, they’d take more of their designs from nature. Those two little boxwood blossoms snuggled next to each other would make beautiful earrings. Perhaps Cloisonné, with a combination of enamel and gem inlay. And the storks bill is marvelous!

    Like

    Comment by shoreacres — May 1, 2012 @ 10:16 pm

    • I agree. And the small sizes of most of the wildflowers would be just right for very exquisite jewelry!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 1, 2012 @ 10:54 pm

  14. There is nothing “common” about your photo of the dandelion. I think your pictures helped me identify a flowering shrub I found last year … it looks very much like your honeysuckle (only on a bush) … time to research some more.

    Like

    Comment by bearyweather — May 2, 2012 @ 6:04 am

    • This honeysuckle is a shrub, and USDA Plants shows that one similar species (Lonicera canadensis) does grow in your state.

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      Comment by montucky — May 2, 2012 @ 10:27 pm

  15. Wow you guys are having quite a spring! Super photos!!!

    Like

    Comment by dhphotosite — May 2, 2012 @ 8:59 am

    • We are, finally, but it is still a cool and wet one. The flowers have started to bloom now though and it’s a fun time for me!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 2, 2012 @ 10:28 pm

  16. Hey, I do know the common dandelion since I’m fortunate enough to have quite a patch of them! They’re all lovely. I have about 4 different varieties of boxwood in pots on my porch and patio and they seem to do quite well here in the heat.

    Like

    Comment by Candace — May 2, 2012 @ 11:12 pm

    • I wasn’t familiar with boxwood until I encountered these. Interesting that the heat doesn’t bother them!

      There are a lot of folks here this year who have bumper crops of dandelions, some to the point of being a big problem!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 2, 2012 @ 11:54 pm

  17. So nice and beautiful flower photos. In Finland we Erodium cicutarium, but I am not sure if I have seen it.

    Like

    Comment by Sartenada — May 4, 2012 @ 3:46 am

    • It is a very tiny flower and low-growing. Very easy to overlook.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 4, 2012 @ 9:49 pm

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