Montana Outdoors

October 30, 2011

Western Larch

Filed under: Autumn — Tags: — montucky @ 9:38 pm

Western Larch in Autumn

The Western Larch have finally come into full color and are beginning to shed their needles. There is a golden “rain” falling in many parts of our forests.

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55 Comments »

  1. That is unreal!!!!!!! It looks like a painting.

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    Comment by Candace — October 30, 2011 @ 10:57 pm

    • That is an area that was in a fire many years ago and it was replanted, mostly with larch. It is unusual to come across a place where you can get a photo of just larch and I was very happy to see this one!

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      Comment by montucky — October 31, 2011 @ 10:29 am

  2. Wow, just stunning!

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    Comment by Jo Woolf — October 31, 2011 @ 1:11 am

    • In spring, these are a lime green color as the new needles begin to grow. In summer, they are green and look very much like the fir trees and are not noticeable among the rest of the trees. In fall, they really stand out. In winter, they are bare and look as though they were dead.

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      Comment by montucky — October 31, 2011 @ 10:31 am

  3. Oh my goodness, that is AMAZING!

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    Comment by TheDailyClick — October 31, 2011 @ 6:25 am

    • This has turned out to be a very good year here for fall colors, including these which have all turned color at once.

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      Comment by montucky — October 31, 2011 @ 10:32 am

  4. Beautiful, they are the same stunning yellow that our Aspen trees take on.

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    Comment by anniespickns — October 31, 2011 @ 7:10 am

    • Yes, the color is very similar. Our Aspens here have already lost their leaves and the Larch have turned, keeping the colors going!

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      Comment by montucky — October 31, 2011 @ 10:34 am

  5. Very pretty. They look like the trees that grow in the wet areas around here .. Tamarack. Their yellow needles have already started to fall and carpet the ground.

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    Comment by bearyweather — October 31, 2011 @ 7:36 am

    • These are very close relatives to the eastern Tamarac and wasn’t understood to be a different species until 1849. When I was a kid, everyone around here called them Tamarac, and I understand that “western” Tamarack is still a common name for them here. For another month, or until we get heavy snow, most of the forest roads will be golden from their needles. It’s very pleasant to walk or drive on that golden carpet!

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      Comment by montucky — October 31, 2011 @ 10:40 am

      • Are Tamarack are at their peak right now … I think a big wind could take them down pretty quick, but the rain and snow will probably get to them first.
        Hey … you got your commenters icons back! Thanks …

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        Comment by bearyweather — November 1, 2011 @ 12:00 pm

        • Wind or rain will get the Larch needles falling fast now too. They are about at their peak.

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          Comment by montucky — November 1, 2011 @ 10:24 pm

  6. I hadn’t heard of the larch until last year. Our upland (dry) cypress will turn a nice russet-red, but they’re a very poor second to these. Every time I think you can’t find something even more beautiful, you do.

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    Comment by shoreacres — October 31, 2011 @ 8:24 am

    • These are as pretty this year as I’ve ever seen them. I will also post photos of individuals. The largest get to be over 200 feet tall.

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      Comment by montucky — October 31, 2011 @ 10:41 am

  7. Simply gorgeous! The photo looks like a painting!

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    Comment by Barbara — October 31, 2011 @ 10:10 am

    • I’m sure there are folks who do paint scenes of the Larch. I can imagine it would tak infinite time and patience to paint a scene like this! The forests are so pretty right now it just drives me nuts trying to capture as much of it as I can!

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      Comment by montucky — October 31, 2011 @ 10:44 am

  8. Great tree, great color!

    Malcolm

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    Comment by knightofswords — October 31, 2011 @ 11:36 am

  9. Wow! Fantastic!!!

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    Comment by Roberta — October 31, 2011 @ 11:37 am

    • They are spectacular when they turn color. It’s something to look forward each fall!

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      Comment by montucky — October 31, 2011 @ 3:09 pm

  10. Absolutely stunning, Montucky! I love this image!

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    Comment by Watching Seasons — October 31, 2011 @ 12:00 pm

    • I’ve always said that the way to eat serviceberries is to put a whole handful in your mouth at once. Seeing a whole mountainside of Larch does the same thing for your eyes.

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      Comment by montucky — October 31, 2011 @ 3:11 pm

  11. Oh, what a lovely shot! We have tamarack here, but I can only think of one place where they grow in a group. Larch trees drop their needles, too, don’t they?

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    Comment by sandy — October 31, 2011 @ 2:25 pm

    • Yes, the forest roads will soon be all golden with Larch needles. In places you can drive 20 miles on their golden carpet. As far as I can tell, Larch and Tamarack are very closely related.

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      Comment by montucky — October 31, 2011 @ 3:12 pm

  12. Hi Montucky, Whoo-hoo! Beautiful golden trees! Such a great picture of that Fall color! Have an excellent evening and enjoy the scenery!

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    Comment by wildlifewatcher — October 31, 2011 @ 3:37 pm

  13. Now that’s what I call a golden opportunity! Took my breath away!!

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    Comment by kcjewel — October 31, 2011 @ 6:49 pm

    • “Golden opportunity”: a good way to put it! I wish you could have seen it in person!

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      Comment by montucky — October 31, 2011 @ 7:24 pm

  14. Stunning….that must be something to walk through. Here we have hickory woods that turn golden in the fall, but this looks so much more spectacular.

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    Comment by kateri — October 31, 2011 @ 8:59 pm

    • It’s a wonderful experience, especially when the sun is out. I can’t think of anything like it.

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      Comment by montucky — October 31, 2011 @ 10:35 pm

  15. You did an excellent job of using the horizontal branches at the left and right to frame all the vertical larches in the center. In addition, the overall color of the scene is so expressive of fall.

    Steve Schwartzman
    http://portraitsofwildflowers.wordpress.com

    Like

    Comment by Steve Schwartzman — November 1, 2011 @ 5:52 am

    • It’s rather rare to shoot something simply for color. I loved doing it!

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      Comment by montucky — November 1, 2011 @ 8:59 am

  16. GORGEOUS GORGEOUS & Yes, STILL GORGEOUS!!! =)

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    Comment by Tricia — November 1, 2011 @ 11:30 am

    • I’ve wanted that kind of photo for quite some time, nothing but color. Finally got it!

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      Comment by montucky — November 1, 2011 @ 10:21 pm

  17. Wow, Dad! Beautiful!!!

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    Comment by Juls — November 1, 2011 @ 1:52 pm

    • Thanks Hon! That’s just a few miles from the Big Hole lookout near Weeksville Divide.

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      Comment by montucky — November 1, 2011 @ 10:22 pm

  18. As I stated the depth along with strength these trees stand tall and proud. I learn so much beauty of nature on your site.

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    Comment by Evangeline — November 2, 2011 @ 6:29 am

  19. Such a pretty sight.

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    Comment by Homestead Ramblings — November 2, 2011 @ 11:12 am

  20. Just plain gorgeous!!!!

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    Comment by dhphotosite — November 3, 2011 @ 9:03 am

    • It should get prettier every year too, as the trees grow.

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      Comment by montucky — November 3, 2011 @ 4:18 pm

  21. I was not able to remove my eyes from Your awesome photo for a long time. I do love Your photo!!!

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    Comment by sartenada — November 4, 2011 @ 4:15 am

    • I was very happy to get that photo. It is unusual that so many trees all changed color at the same time. I’m glad that you liked it!

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      Comment by montucky — November 4, 2011 @ 8:40 pm

  22. that color sure is something!

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    Comment by silken — November 5, 2011 @ 7:50 pm

  23. Wow, that is larch to the 9th degree! They don’t seem to grow in such big patches around here.

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    Comment by Kim — November 9, 2011 @ 6:36 pm

    • I have a feeling that this was a replanting after a fire or logging, although I have seen similar, but smaller, groups of Larch that appeared quite natural. Either way, it is a whole lot of Larch expressing themselves!

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      Comment by montucky — November 9, 2011 @ 11:37 pm

  24. bearyweather sent me over to look at your western larches and they are GORGEOUS! What a wonderful photo. The golden rain sounds so soft and inviting. I posted a blog all about our larches (tamaracks) here in the upper Peninsula the other day: http://upwoods.wordpress.com/2011/11/08/needles-of-fiery-orange/

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    Comment by Kathy — November 10, 2011 @ 8:36 am

    • Thanks for visiting, Kathy! I really enjoyed your post on the tamaracks that you have there. They are marvelous trees!

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      Comment by montucky — November 10, 2011 @ 10:42 pm

  25. I really love the processing you put into these photos. Wow… Amazing color.

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    Comment by Preston — November 11, 2011 @ 7:14 am

    • Thanks Preston. The fall colors have been great here this year.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 11, 2011 @ 11:09 pm

  26. Wow, I’ve never seen a group of them like this before, a symphony of yellow!

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    Comment by farmhouse stories — November 11, 2011 @ 8:20 am

    • It’s a little unusual to be able to get into a section of forest that is nearly all larch, but what a flood of color it is!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 11, 2011 @ 11:10 pm


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