Montana Outdoors

October 25, 2011

A few more trail photos

Filed under: Autumn, Baldy Mountain roadless area — Tags: , — montucky @ 10:08 pm

I seem to be getting behind in posting photos from my hikes and so I will attempt to catch up. Someone may enjoy seeing them and otherwise they just sit there buried in IPhoto files, collecting virtual dust. These were taken from the Baldy Mountain trail in the Baldy Mountain Roadless area on October 14. Soon, the scenes along that trail will be covered with white, but the colors that now show through will be buried deep below the surface.

Baldy Mountain trail 340

Baldy Mountain trail 340

Baldy Mountain trail 340

Baldy Mountain trail 340

Baldy Mountain trail 340

Baldy Mountain trail 340

Baldy Mountain trail 340

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29 Comments »

  1. Wonderful! What is the elevation?

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    Comment by Roberta — October 25, 2011 @ 11:05 pm

    • These were taken between 6,500 feet and 7,000. I could see the mountain today: it has gotten whiter up there!

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      Comment by montucky — October 25, 2011 @ 11:08 pm

  2. I for one never get tired of seeing more trail photos from this area! Keep ’em coming!

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    Comment by columbiahighlands — October 25, 2011 @ 11:34 pm

    • Thanks for the encouragement, Aaron! I expect to have more until the snow blocks my access to the trails for the winter. I’m hoping to do much more hiking in the roadless areas next summer than I was able to do this year!

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      Comment by montucky — October 26, 2011 @ 12:22 am

  3. Beautiful pics – such a contrast to your photos of 7th October. How much snow do you get in winter?

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    Comment by Jo Woolf — October 26, 2011 @ 12:40 am

    • It varies widely across the state. East of the Continental divide there are locations that get no more than 20 inches annually. Here where I live in the northwest part of the state we get 50 – 60 inches in the valleys. Where these photos were taken, probably 150 inches. In the mountains another 80 miles to the northwest, up to 300.

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      Comment by montucky — October 26, 2011 @ 8:45 am

      • That’s a LOT! We made a fuss last year over three feet of snow, which was way above average. Montana must be spectacular in winter.

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        Comment by Jo Woolf — October 27, 2011 @ 1:45 pm

  4. Yes, definitely enjoy seeing them 🙂
    Did you get any macros of the snow-dusted leaves/needles/branches?

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    Comment by TheDailyClick — October 26, 2011 @ 3:32 am

    • I didn’t try. This was very warm, wet snow and wouldn’t look at all like the cold, dry fluffy stuff. I’ll get some of that later.

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      Comment by montucky — October 26, 2011 @ 8:46 am

  5. Much better to share a dusting of snow, than to allow these to gather digital-dust! What these photos show, of course, is what passed for our “blizzard” last year, here in Houston. When we have this much snow, schools close and peanut butter sales go up. Context is everything!

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    Comment by shoreacres — October 26, 2011 @ 7:34 am

    • It sure is. I can only imagine what a snowfall would do to your traffic down there! We are used to winter weather here and most are well prepared for it (those who aren’t are at the bottom of the learning curve). I noticed last week at the bottom of a hill just outside of Missoula, they have the winter signs up that say “Chain-up area”. I’ve always found it interesting to point out that in mid-winter it’s usually colder outside our house than inside the freezing compartment in the refrigerator. We haven’t had a good old-fashioned blizzard here for years though, although we’ve had some pretty sizable snowfalls.

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      Comment by montucky — October 26, 2011 @ 8:56 am

  6. Wow what an awesome hike this must have been. I can smell the fir trees and hear the solitude.

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    Comment by dhphotosite — October 26, 2011 @ 9:08 am

    • That’s a favorite trail. The trail head is about a half hour drive, the trail is in a roadless area and on clear days there are almost endless views from the peak at the top. I usually go there at least three times in a year and each time is different and beautiful.

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      Comment by montucky — October 26, 2011 @ 9:53 pm

  7. These trails speak to me in ways I don’t fully understand. I would love to be walking on any of them and under just those conditions. Beautiful.

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    Comment by Teresa Evangeline — October 26, 2011 @ 10:30 am

    • They speak to me too, Teresa. It’s difficult to explain, but I have grown to be more comfortable and at home there than I have ever been anywhere else. At least for now, our species has the option of living in one of two different worlds: the natural one and the artificial one that we create. I’ve gotten over being surprised at finding which one is the more comfortable.

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      Comment by montucky — October 26, 2011 @ 10:04 pm

  8. Just gorgeous. I have the opposite problem, no photos right now. With it getting dark so early I never have time when I get home from work so unless I take a bunch on the weekends, I run out.

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    Comment by Candace — October 26, 2011 @ 7:43 pm

    • I know what you mean. I get into that situation too when winter keeps me from going to many of the places where I would like to go. It’s a “feast or famine” thing.

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      Comment by montucky — October 26, 2011 @ 10:07 pm

  9. Those photos seem so foreign to me down here, but they are places I want to see some day. What a dusting snow.

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    Comment by Jack Matthews — October 26, 2011 @ 7:56 pm

    • The surroundings are certainly very different from there to here: both are fascinating and beautiful. I sure hope you will be able to see some of the wild country here some day. I know you will love it!

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      Comment by montucky — October 26, 2011 @ 10:12 pm

  10. Love looking at those scenes, knowing that if I was there I’d have cold feet. What do you wear to keep your feet warm and dry on your expeditions?

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    Comment by Kim — October 26, 2011 @ 9:28 pm

    • I have a variety of footwear. In summer and on into winter when it’s still above zero, I prefer just a good pair of waterproof hiking boots and some good, warm boot socks inside; I have several pairs. If the snow is quite deep or the temperature is in the negatives, a pair of Sorels (or similar type) with wool-felt liners works best for me. I consider my boots to be the most important part of my equipment for comfort, safety and confidence.

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      Comment by montucky — October 26, 2011 @ 10:20 pm

  11. Hi Montucky, Gee, you are masterful at taking pictures! Excellent and very beautiful shots of the lovely terrain along the trails. Glad you enjoyed the hikes and shared the views! Have a wonderful Thursday!

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    Comment by wildlifewatcher — October 26, 2011 @ 10:17 pm

  12. More gorgeous scenes …. do you know what the red leafed plant is in the 5th photo?

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    Comment by bearyweather — October 27, 2011 @ 6:02 pm

    • Yes, those are huckleberry. (Vaccinium membranaceum: thinleaf huckleberry)

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      Comment by montucky — October 27, 2011 @ 8:45 pm

  13. Montana trails are more exciting than the typical Ohio trail 🙂 I enjoy the photos!

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    Comment by Watching Seasons — October 27, 2011 @ 8:06 pm

    • I’m glad you enjoyed the photos! I wonder what the Ohio trails were like 200 years ago.

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      Comment by montucky — October 27, 2011 @ 8:47 pm

  14. What a lovely set of photos. In the first photo rime on the ground is the first sign of winter and cold. The third photo from the bottom is awesome. The trail is so interesting that I would like to hike on it! Thank You for posting these “prewinter” photos.

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    Comment by sartenada — October 28, 2011 @ 1:43 am

    • I hinkt you would really enjoy that trail, Matti! Since those photos were taken, there have been several new snows on that area that have come and melted. Soon they will no onger melt until spring.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 28, 2011 @ 8:40 pm


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