Montana Outdoors

June 3, 2011

Skyrocket

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , , — montucky @ 12:12 am

Scarlet Gilia, Skyrocket

Skyrocket, Scarlet Gilia, Ipomopsis aggregata 6/2

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36 Comments »

  1. I saw this in a catalog earlier in the year. The photo they used did not do it justice. Your shot does.

    Like

    Comment by sandy — June 3, 2011 @ 5:07 am

    • Thanks Sandy. This one just started blooming. It is very close to the water level in the river at its high level: I hope it survives!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 3, 2011 @ 11:13 am

  2. Quite a dramatic photo. This is a flower I have never seen before. Hummingbirds would love this one.

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    Comment by kateri — June 3, 2011 @ 5:43 am

    • It’s another wildflower that is native only in the west. Yes, I would think the hummers would like it. This is the first bloom that I’ve seen this year, and the plant is rather small. The ones that come in later will be taller and better for the birds to reach.

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      Comment by montucky — June 3, 2011 @ 11:32 am

  3. Oooooo that red! Cadmium red at its most pure!

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    Comment by Roberta Warshaw — June 3, 2011 @ 6:33 am

    • This is the most red of all our flowers. Some of the Indian Paintbrushes come close, but there it is mixed with green too.

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      Comment by montucky — June 3, 2011 @ 11:33 am

  4. Very showy.

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    Comment by knightofswords — June 3, 2011 @ 8:44 am

  5. Hi Montucky, That is a very beautiful flower and a great shot! Thanks for showing us these wildflowers! Have an excellent Friday!

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    Comment by wildlifewatcher — June 3, 2011 @ 9:30 am

  6. Incredible recent posts! Your images have really outdone themselves.

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    Comment by Daveabirding — June 3, 2011 @ 10:43 am

    • Thanks Dave. The flowers are excellent this year and the cloudy weather is just about perfect for photography. I’m getting spoiled.

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      Comment by montucky — June 3, 2011 @ 11:36 am

  7. An absolutely beautiful wildflower. Here in Ohio, we have very few natural plants that bloom scarlet.

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    Comment by Watching Seasons — June 3, 2011 @ 11:47 am

    • There are very few here too: this one is the brightest. Thank you for visiting!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 3, 2011 @ 1:18 pm

  8. What a great name for this beauty. It does look like a rocket shot into the sky!

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    Comment by Bo Mackison — June 3, 2011 @ 12:33 pm

    • I like the name too. I can never get over the depth of its color.

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      Comment by montucky — June 3, 2011 @ 1:19 pm

  9. more of that “pretty stuff”. beautiful red color and I love the effect used here.

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    Comment by silken — June 3, 2011 @ 5:12 pm

    • I was happy with the depth of field for the shot. There was just barely enough light to make that setting work.

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      Comment by montucky — June 3, 2011 @ 9:44 pm

  10. Wow … what a dramatic picture. I do not think there is anything that vibrantly red growing in my woods.

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    Comment by bearyweather — June 3, 2011 @ 5:33 pm

    • Yes, it’s a beautiful red. The Indian Paints here have that color, but not in a solid blossom.

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      Comment by montucky — June 3, 2011 @ 9:46 pm

  11. Beautiful!

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    Comment by mitambien — June 3, 2011 @ 7:44 pm

  12. This really does resemble a skyrocket, in two ways. One is the rocket. The other is the fireworks.

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    Comment by Ratty — June 3, 2011 @ 9:07 pm

    • I hadn’t thought of it that way Ratty, but you’re right!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 3, 2011 @ 9:47 pm

  13. Very nice DOF…

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    Comment by Stacey Dawn — June 4, 2011 @ 12:23 pm

    • The way I have to shoot wildflowers (without the use of a tripod) my options for controlling DOF are somewhat limited on cloudy days, but there was just enough light for this one.

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      Comment by montucky — June 4, 2011 @ 9:24 pm

  14. This is one of those flowers that hummingbirds will do an abrupt U turn to visit. The color is easily spotted as they zip around. Nice image. No idea of scale though – your images are larger than life. Isn’t this flower about 1 inch in length?

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    Comment by Kim — June 4, 2011 @ 8:52 pm

    • Yes, the “trumpet” is about an inch long. This particular one is blooming very early for the species and it is smaller than the ones will be in another couple of weeks. Also requires using the “mustache-in-the-dirt” shooting technique.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 4, 2011 @ 9:25 pm

  15. Some of the wildflowers are so aptly named. Beautiful flower.

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    Comment by Candace — June 5, 2011 @ 10:03 pm

    • Yes, this one is well named and a real bright spot to see in the forest!

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      Comment by montucky — June 5, 2011 @ 10:16 pm

  16. What a photo from an incredible beauty! Never seen it.

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    Comment by sartenada — June 10, 2011 @ 1:38 am

    • As far as I can tell, this one grows only in the western part of the U.S.

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      Comment by montucky — June 10, 2011 @ 7:51 pm

  17. Lovely macro. Gorgeous color and detail.

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    Comment by Victoria — June 13, 2011 @ 11:24 am

    • This particular one is under six feet of water now. I wonder if the plant will survive.

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      Comment by montucky — June 13, 2011 @ 10:16 pm

  18. Nice photograph. In central Texas we have Ipomopsis rubra, which looks similar and even has a yellow variety.

    I’m impressed that you’ve done over 300 posts on wildflowers: good for you and for the cause (of native plants)! I’ve been at it for not even two weeks now, at

    http://portraitsofwildflowers.wordpress.com

    Like

    Comment by wordconnections — June 14, 2011 @ 10:03 pm

    • I bet it is lovely in yellow! Thank you for visiting and for the link to your new site. I think I will enjoy it!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 15, 2011 @ 12:06 am


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