Montana Outdoors

September 10, 2010

White and white

Some of the last flowers and “flying flowers” of the summer.

White Heath AsterWhite Heath Aster, Symphyotrichum ericoides

Pine White ButterflyPine White Butterfly

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22 Comments »

  1. Love the earthy tones of the bokeh in the first photo. Just beautiful. And the detail on the butterfly is amazing. Great captures.

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    Comment by Robin — September 11, 2010 @ 5:30 am

    • This type of Aster seems to develop late in the summer when most everything else is turning brown, hence the background. It’s also interesting because of the clusters of blossoms.

      The butterfly seemed to have a great deal of patience for a change and let me get close. They seem to do that late in the summer.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — September 11, 2010 @ 9:14 am

  2. Love these whites. Never seen a pine white butterfly.

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    Comment by Bo Mackison — September 11, 2010 @ 6:11 am

    • The Pine White is a western species and lives on Ponderosa pine, White pine and several species of Fir trees. They are very common in this area.

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      Comment by montucky — September 11, 2010 @ 9:15 am

  3. That is a butterfly I have never seen. Another thing to look forward to when I move west.

    I saw heath asters near the ocean last week. Do they grow in huge clumps there, too?

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    Comment by sandy — September 11, 2010 @ 10:55 am

    • The Pine White is a favorite of mine. Very pretty!

      Yes, there are big clumps of them all over now. The ones up high are newer and fresher.

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      Comment by montucky — September 11, 2010 @ 8:51 pm

  4. Nice to see some bright flowers today after a difficult week.

    Malcolm

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    Comment by knightofswords — September 11, 2010 @ 1:13 pm

    • I just visited your site. I know how difficult that is. You and L. are in our thoughts.

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      Comment by montucky — September 11, 2010 @ 8:54 pm

  5. I suspect that one of the asters we have is the Heath aster as well. Love the butterfly photo. Both the butterfly and the aster look so delicate.

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    Comment by kateri — September 11, 2010 @ 6:27 pm

    • I think the Asters have a good plan: they bloom late in the summer when they catch all of the attention. I love the summer whites: the winter white will be here soon enough.

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      Comment by montucky — September 11, 2010 @ 8:56 pm

  6. Love the photo of asters! They remind me of daisies…. 🙂

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    Comment by Maureen — September 11, 2010 @ 7:04 pm

    • For a long time I thought they were daisies. They are closely related and come from a great family! I hope things are going well for you and Eric!

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      Comment by montucky — September 11, 2010 @ 8:58 pm

  7. The White Heath Aster is beautifully photographed as it stands out. I just love the butterfly… how so very lovely! Gorgeous shots!

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    Comment by Anna — September 12, 2010 @ 8:37 am

    • Thanks, Anna. That Aster shot was set up and framed by Mother Nature: I was lucky enough to see it! I just read an article in one of the regional papers about the Pine Whites. They are so abundant this year in the Bitterroot National Forest that they are damaging some of the trees. A big swarm of them would be something to see!

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      Comment by montucky — September 12, 2010 @ 8:59 pm

  8. Oh what a beautiful white flutterby!

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    Comment by Tricia — September 12, 2010 @ 12:36 pm

    • I love the whites: we have lots of them here. Also the Blues, but these Pine Whites are much larger.

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      Comment by montucky — September 12, 2010 @ 9:00 pm

  9. Beautiful shots!

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    Comment by Jeff Lynch — September 12, 2010 @ 3:40 pm

  10. Beautiful photo of the flying flower!

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    Comment by Candace — September 13, 2010 @ 6:51 pm

  11. I love that “macro” photo from butterfly. Your photo is like severed from some nature book. Very lovely.

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    Comment by sartenada — September 16, 2010 @ 11:21 pm


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