Montana Outdoors

April 22, 2009

Pretty little pink flower

This pretty little flower has been fascinating me for the last few days. It’s less than a quarter of an inch across and lives only a couple of inches off the ground.

Pretty little pink flower

Could these two versions indicate female and male?

Pretty little pink flower

Whatever it is, its visitors seem to wear their sequined jackets!

Pretty little pink flower

I would love to know what it is!   Thank you, Maureen for the ID, Redstem Stork’s Bill, Erodium cicutarium!

26 Comments »

  1. I’m amazed at how many beautiful wild flowers you have blooming in MT. I thought your season would be behind ours due to all the snow you had, but it looks like the northeast is way behind Montana! i like the second shot the best. Nice work!

    Like

    Comment by Cedar — April 22, 2009 @ 9:40 am

    • We started early, then spring was put on hold for awhile, then it came back and the flowers started to bloom. Now we’re going into a cold spell again tonight. Now the northeast can catch up!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 22, 2009 @ 6:58 pm

  2. This is a beautiful flower. I love the sparkles and the visitor’s jacket is quite impressive.

    Like

    Comment by Preston Surface — April 22, 2009 @ 1:39 pm

    • Yes, that little visitor dressed for the occasion, didn’t it!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 22, 2009 @ 6:59 pm

  3. […] montucky added an interesting post on Pretty little pink flower « Montana OutdoorsHere’s a small excerptThis pretty little flower has been fascinating me for the last few days and I have no idea what it is. It’s less than a quarter of an inch across and lives only a couple of inches off the ground. Pretty little pink flower … […]

    Like

    Pingback by Topics about Montana » Pretty little pink flower « Montana Outdoors — April 22, 2009 @ 2:04 pm

  4. These are great. Let’s see how long it takes for a tsar of wildflowers to see the photo and say, hey, I know what that is.

    Malcolm

    Like

    Comment by knightofswords — April 22, 2009 @ 2:39 pm

    • You are prophetic, Malcolm! Maureen seems to have hit it right on! Redstem stork’s bill
      Erodium cicutarium!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 22, 2009 @ 7:10 pm

  5. This flower looks like a geranium (Stork’s Bill)? Beautiful! Happy Spring!

    Like

    Comment by Maureen — April 22, 2009 @ 4:40 pm

    • Thanks Maureen! That looks like it for sure! Redstem stork’s bill Erodium cicutarium

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 22, 2009 @ 7:11 pm

      • I thought the surprise visitor stole the show on that photo! It certainly does have geranium colors!

        Like

        Comment by montucky — April 22, 2009 @ 7:13 pm

  6. Love the sparkly flower! And the visitor in the 3rd on too!

    Like

    Comment by Stacey - Addicted to The Click — April 22, 2009 @ 6:11 pm

  7. I’m thinking the flowers aren’t male and female, but rather, the anthers have fallen off the older bottom flower already. Whatever the case, beautiful things sure do come in tiny packages! I love seeing such small flowers and insects magnified and up close. Their irridescent colors are breathtaking!

    Like

    Comment by Tabbie — April 22, 2009 @ 9:41 pm

    • I love being able to see the tiny things, too. My quality of life has improved a lot through a lens!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 22, 2009 @ 9:49 pm

  8. Great macros! It’s so tiny, in life, but looks much larger in your photos.

    Agree w/Erodium cicutarium, BTW

    Like

    Comment by Adam R. Paul — April 23, 2009 @ 7:47 pm

    • They really are tiny, but very pretty. It is nice to identify them, something I’m just plain not good at!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 23, 2009 @ 9:49 pm

  9. Beautiful flowers, Terry. I love when the petals of those little one take on an almost metallic sheen. I find Spring Beauties do that as well as a couple of other tiny flowers. Good catch!

    Like

    Comment by edvatza — April 24, 2009 @ 4:47 am

    • Thanks Ed. I like that metallic look too. It’s a challenge to catch it just right, but a good learning experience.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 24, 2009 @ 7:45 am

  10. Ooooo!! That’s beautiful!! I’m apparently No Good at spotting wildflowers while I’m hiking. I’m looking forward to getting out with you again, so I can get some practice.

    Like

    Comment by gradschoolsara — April 24, 2009 @ 9:45 am

    • Well, we can get some practice in about another week, right? Weather permitting.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 24, 2009 @ 10:09 am

  11. I love the color and delicate nature in these little gems Terry, you are definitely nailing the wildflowers in your neck of the woods !!

    Keep em coming !!

    Like

    Comment by Bernie Kasper — April 24, 2009 @ 2:55 pm

    • Thanks Bernie! New species are starting to bloom every day now. It’s hard to keep up with them and get anything else done at the same time!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 24, 2009 @ 5:35 pm

  12. WOW montucky! the colors in these shots is so gorgeous. the petals pastel dyed…the iridescence of the insect…very very pretty

    Like

    Comment by silken — April 25, 2009 @ 9:00 pm

    • Yes, the light was just right. My Son was fishing and I was exploring the bank of the river when I found these. The little visitor just volunteered to pose!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 25, 2009 @ 9:24 pm

      • I sure it’s ERODIUM not Erocium! A slight misspelling.

        Like

        Comment by chris — April 26, 2009 @ 9:18 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: