Montana Outdoors

June 26, 2008

The longest three mile trail in Montana (Part 3)

Here are some of the flowers growing along the upper part of trail 205 ( 3,500 ft to 5,000 ft).

Red clover

Red clover

Miner’s lettuce, claytonia perfoliata

Unknown

Tolmie star-tulip

Tolmie star-tulip

Tolmie star-tulips

Tolmie star-tulips

A hillside of Blue-eyed Marys

A hillside of Blue-eyed Marys

A ridgetop covered with Arrowleaf Balsamroot

A ridge covered with Arrowleaf Balsamroot

Very colorful Tolmies

Very colorful Tolmies

Yellow Indian Paintbrush

Yellow Indian Paintbrush

Lupine

Lupine

Advertisements

14 Comments »

  1. Oooh. Ahhh.

    Beautiful flowers, and as always, I love learning what they are.

    Like

    Comment by Patia — June 26, 2008 @ 7:41 pm

  2. To have that wonderful variety of flowers – of COURSE it’s got to be the longest 3 mile trail in Montana. You are one lucky devil!

    Like

    Comment by Bo — June 26, 2008 @ 8:07 pm

  3. I’ve never seen a yellow indian paintbrush or red clover. that is one my son needed for his flower project. they are supposedly abundant in TX, but we’ve never found any!

    Like

    Comment by silken — June 26, 2008 @ 9:24 pm

  4. Clover is sweet. I never tire of it in its many forms. The scent is always sweet. Have you got any yellow clovers in Montana?

    Like

    Comment by Tabbie — June 26, 2008 @ 10:19 pm

  5. Patia,

    Yes, there are some beauties out there. I try ti identify as many as possible, but some still elude me. I guess I’m more adapted to finding them than I am to identifying them.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 26, 2008 @ 10:32 pm

  6. Bo,

    It truly is wonderful to be able to see that much variety in one outing. That’s a pretty ambitious trail, but worth the effort to hike it, and it appears to have very little use, if any. There were elk trails that intersected it that were larger and better used that 205: if it were not for some ancient blaze marks it would have been nearly impossible to stay on it. I’ll post some photos of the trail itself and some of the scenery soon.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 26, 2008 @ 10:38 pm

  7. silken,

    The yellow paints are pretty scarce, but also not nearly as visible as the reds so they can be missed. I don’t see a lot of red clover, but it really isn’t rare here. We have a lot of white clover in our lawn, including one area that has many 4-leaf clovers.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 26, 2008 @ 10:41 pm

  8. Tabbie,

    I also like clover. I still pull some apart to get a taste of the nectar. Yes, we have yellow clover, the very tall variety. It covers the edges of many of the mountain roads especially. It hasn’t started to bloom yet this year though.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 26, 2008 @ 10:44 pm

  9. Just gorgeous. The colorful Tolmies are *so* pretty (and furry inside)! And the lupines such a shock of gorgeous blue. It must be an utter delight to see them when hiking.

    Like

    Comment by Sara — June 27, 2008 @ 5:33 am

  10. The Tolmies are just everywhere this year, and the Lupines are reaching their peak right now. They are interesting because when in a shady area they appear a dark vivid blue and in full sun a very pleasant light color. It has been a very colorful spring and early summer!

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 27, 2008 @ 7:01 am

  11. The Tolmies are drop-dead gorgeous. Absolute epitomes of nature’s beauty. Stunning. I’m quite speechless after seeing these photographs. No matter how many times I see flowers, even if the same type of flower, I can never ever get ‘bored’ by it. Each and every one of them is exuding life’s perfection from it. Stunning work! 🙂

    P.S. I shifted again. wordpress.com didn’t really suit me – I couldn’t get that feeling of belonging, if you know what I mean! 🙂

    Like

    Comment by Sumedh — June 27, 2008 @ 7:20 am

  12. Wow, the tolmies are incredible, I’ve never seen anything like them! What family are they in, do you know?

    Like

    Comment by teaspoon — June 27, 2008 @ 11:04 am

  13. Sumedh,

    The Tolmies are indeed incredible. There are so many different variations in them that I’m often surprised.

    I changed your address in my blogroll. Sorry to hear WordPress didn’t work out for you. It took me a little time to get comfortable here but now I like it a lot.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 27, 2008 @ 1:38 pm

  14. teaspoon,

    They’re actually not a tulip at all, but a member of the lily family. (Calochortus tolmiei) I noticed them for the first time last summer and this year they seem to be everywhere. As far as I can tell they’re not even supposed to grow in Montana but they don’t know it.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 27, 2008 @ 1:42 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: