Montana Outdoors

June 25, 2008

Orange and Yellow

The Honeysuckle is now blooming in the woods and it was surprising today to see Stonecrop, usually a blossom of late summer. Between the two though, they really brighten things up!

Orange Honeysuckle, lonicera ciliosa

Orange Honeysuckle

Orange Honeysuckle

Orange Honeysuckle

Stonecrop sedum

Stonecrop

Stonecrop

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13 Comments »

  1. Hi, These flowers are extremely difficult to shoot, especially coz of their shapes. I admire the second image though. I like the clustered approach here as compared to the isolation.

    The third image looks a lil harsh – dont know if its coz of my monitor but it could also be due to a lil more sharpness.

    The last image looks extremely sharp. Nice work. I wish the background was a lil lighter though. But as I said, its difficult to shoot these images in isolation, but overall you have got some nice pictures here.

    Cheers!
    Jay
    http://www.photoduniya.com/

    Like

    Comment by Jay — June 25, 2008 @ 7:21 pm

  2. Thanks for visiting and commenting, Jay! There are certainly challenges in outdoor photography! That’s a lot of the fun of it.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 25, 2008 @ 8:14 pm

  3. The honeysuckle’s different from the kind we get around here. Around here it’s yellow and white (Maybe Lonicera japonica? I know it’s an invasive). Does the beautiful (gorgeous!) red and orange honeysuckle have the thing where you can pull on the base of the flower and get the drop of nectar?

    Thanks *so* much for sharing! My mouth is watering with wanting to taste. 😀

    Like

    Comment by Sara — June 25, 2008 @ 9:50 pm

  4. I haven’t tried that to get nectar. I’ll try it next time I see some. They are plentiful right now in some areas.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 25, 2008 @ 10:06 pm

  5. Is that a fragrant variety of honeysuckle? I wonder if global warming is somehow playing a part in the early bloom on the sedum. Hmmm…Lovely flowers, though, and lovely photos too as always.

    Like

    Comment by Tabbie — June 25, 2008 @ 10:15 pm

  6. Gorgeous! Beautiful…

    😀

    Like

    Comment by Sumedh — June 26, 2008 @ 3:54 am

  7. As always I enjoy your closeups of nature,… and thanks for your kind words on my blog! You are much appreciated!

    Like

    Comment by Cedar — June 26, 2008 @ 4:30 am

  8. Tabbie,

    Yes, it is, although the scent is not very strong. I doubt that global warming affects anything here this year: it was one of our coldest and wettest winters and spring was very late. More likely the exact spot where these were growing, on an open bank which gets full sun all day. They were very local.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 26, 2008 @ 6:45 am

  9. Thanks, Sumedh! Lots of full color in these two!

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 26, 2008 @ 6:46 am

  10. I enjoyed your blog, Cedar and I’ll be back for more visits! You also live in a beautiful part of the country and since I have never been there, it’s nice to see it through your eyes.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 26, 2008 @ 6:50 am

  11. I’ve never seen orange honeysuckle, how pretty! do ya’ll pull the middles out to suck on?

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    Comment by silken — June 26, 2008 @ 9:23 pm

  12. I don’t know about that but I’m going to try. They are plentiful at a location near here so I can experiment a little.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 26, 2008 @ 10:26 pm

  13. a past time we did a lot as kids! hope yours are sweet!

    Like

    Comment by silken — June 27, 2008 @ 10:29 pm


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