Montana Outdoors

June 21, 2008

The longest three mile trail in Montana (Part 2)

Here are some of the flowers which grow along the lower part of trail 205. (Yes, I do favor the Harebells: I see so few of them and those only in this general area of the Coeur d’Alene Mountains.)

Harebells, campanula rotundifolia
Harebells, Bluebells of Scotland

Harebells, Bluebells of Scotland

Harebells, Bluebells of Scotland

Unknown
Unknown

Unknown
Unknown

Orange Honeysuckle, lonicera ciliosa
Unknown

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8 Comments »

  1. Wow! You really have me stumped on that first unknown plant below the Harebells. Your photographs are great as usual, and always they are of the most interesting species. I envy the vast natural resource you have so close at hand!

    I hope someone will be able to identify that plant!

    Like

    Comment by Tabbie — June 22, 2008 @ 4:52 am

  2. Once again your closeup photos are awesome!

    Like

    Comment by Cedar — June 22, 2008 @ 7:29 am

  3. Tabbie,

    There certainly are a lot of interesting species in the wild country. We are used to seeing cultivated fields where, of course, the tendency is to encourage one or two things to grow and discourage all others. It appears that Nature prefers variety. I’m always elated to be in the back country and yet a little saddened that so few folks take advantage of its beauty, especially when they could see at least some of it with fairly little effort. The Harebells, for instance, were only a short distance up the trail.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 22, 2008 @ 8:03 am

  4. Thanks, Cedar! There are great subjects to photograph here!

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 22, 2008 @ 8:03 am

  5. Wow, harebells tend to grow like weeds in Wisconsin, so I tend to overlook them, but they are a lovely color and shape, aren’t they? The plant under the harebells is wild – I LOVE its foliage. Something that unusual – surely someone knows what it is. How high were you, Terry, when you saw this plant. Woods? Curious minds just have to know… 🙂

    Like

    Comment by Bo — June 22, 2008 @ 8:05 pm

  6. The Harebells are a real treat for me. I think they’re really special. The other plant is growing on a thinly wooded hillside at an elevation of only about 2,800 feet and there is quite a bit of it so I doubt if it’s rare. It’s surely different though, isn’t it?

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 22, 2008 @ 8:36 pm

  7. Great flower photos, Montucky! I’ve never seen any of them here in California, so, sorry, can’t help ID the unknowns. The last flower has a very interesting shape

    Like

    Comment by Adam R. Paul — June 23, 2008 @ 9:05 am

  8. Again interesting to note the differences in vegetation between there and here despite the fact that our two areas do share many plant species.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 23, 2008 @ 10:12 am


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