Montana Outdoors

June 3, 2008

Violets

I don’t want to forget these tiny spots of color that I see nearly every time I go out. They have their own kind of quiet beauty, usually tucked away back in the green foliage of the forest/clearing interface.

Blue violet, found along Buffalo Bill Creek.

Violet

Blue violet, found along Buffalo Bill Creek.

Violet

Yellow violet, Viola purpurea found in the Coeur d’Alene mountains near Cherry Peak.

Violet

Yellow violet, Viola purpurea found in the Coeur d’Alene mountains near Cherry Peak.

Violet

Early blue violet, Viola adunca found at Munson Creek.

 Early blue violet, Viola adunca

12 Comments »

  1. *Faints*
    The yellow violet is sensational!

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    Comment by Tabbie — June 3, 2008 @ 11:42 pm

  2. Blue violets are wonderful,… as in …. full of wonder. I am so fortunate to have carpets of them around my home here in the Adirondacks in northern NY. It is one of the springtime gifts of living in the woods. Thank you for such lovely photos of my favorite flower!

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    Comment by Cedar — June 4, 2008 @ 4:25 am

  3. Despite their size, they are majestic and hardy little flowers, aren’t they? Beautiful!

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    Comment by Sandy — June 4, 2008 @ 8:07 am

  4. Tabbie,

    I pay special attention to the yellow violets because I’ve seen them in only two locations here and both are quite remote. That makes them a special treat for me.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 4, 2008 @ 9:07 am

  5. Cedar,

    They are indeed springtime gifts and greatly enhance a woodland setting! You are fortunate to have so many of them around!

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 4, 2008 @ 9:11 am

  6. Sandy,

    Yes they are hardy. That’s a good word for them. They’re the solid little citizens of the forest. I always have to get down close and look at them.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 4, 2008 @ 9:13 am

  7. Mmm lovely violets you got there! Oddly, although we have a half-dozen wild violets, I have yet to see a single one that is actually violet, as ours are all yellow & white.

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    Comment by Adam R. Paul — June 4, 2008 @ 9:48 am

  8. In all of my hiking I’ve only ran into yellow violets – it was a shock to find out that there are so many varieties here. (Wow…) Then this week I finally ran into a blue violet (which there are only two varieties here….) I’ll post mine up this week sometime. Meanwhile, pretty shots you took. They are eye catching (especially those little yellow guys) over here they seem to blanket everything that is anywhere near a small stream. However, just this week most of the ones at my elevation have lost their petals. For some unknown reason taking a good shot of the little blue guy was one of the most difficult subjects I’ve had in a very long time. Who’d think something so small would be so difficult to shoot?

    Like

    Comment by aullori — June 4, 2008 @ 10:46 am

  9. Adam,

    Interesting. Around here the yellow is not nearly as common, and I’ve not seen even a single white one. May just be a very localized distribution though.

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    Comment by montucky — June 4, 2008 @ 1:00 pm

  10. Lori,

    I think with wildflowers, especially the smaller ones, so much depends on the location of the flower and the light conditions. I’ve had individuals of the same species that were easy to shoot and other that were hard. Often the shades of color are very difficult to get right too.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 4, 2008 @ 1:06 pm

  11. Huh? Yellow violets? Wouldn’t they then be called ‘yellows’?

    (Great shots of some easily overlooked ground denizens, by the way.)

    Like

    Comment by wolf — June 4, 2008 @ 7:10 pm

  12. Yeah, I know. It took me a long time to call them “violets”. I still don’t understand it. I guess a rose, by any other name…

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 4, 2008 @ 7:17 pm


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