Montana Outdoors

November 7, 2007

Big Hole morning

To the east, a fresh new world; a new day, a new beginning.

Mission Mountains

To the south, the mountain slopes all point down toward a precious stream of life-giving water on its dangerous journey through the valley of men.

Clark Fork Valley

How does one really know where the earth stops and the sky begins? And exactly why would knowing that even matter?

Clark Fork River Valley under the clouds

(Photographed in early morning from the southeast shoulder of Big Hole Peak in the Cabinet Mountains of western Montana.)

12 Comments »

  1. These are really fabulous shots Montucky. There is a poem written by Percy Bysshe Shelley about how the “mountains kiss the high heaven” and your post reminded me of the work. (I think if my mind isn’t misty from your prints) it’s called Love’s Philosophy. Anyway… there are times that the sky and the mountains merge as effortlessly as lovers. I’m thrilled you captured this so beautifully!

    Like

    Comment by aullori — November 8, 2007 @ 12:14 am

  2. I am not familiar with that poem, but I can certainly understand the feeling! The mists on that morning obscured the distinctions between earth and sky and it seemed as though the sky divided itself, part of it covering the valley and the other part remaining as sky. It felt as though I was awarded a great honor, just by being there to see it!

    Like

    Comment by montucky — November 8, 2007 @ 12:45 am

  3. Time is full of these beginnings and endings that you write of. Thanks for capturing their images as well.

    Like

    Comment by Pinhole — November 8, 2007 @ 6:06 am

  4. It’s so difficult to get more than two dimensions in photographs. Views from tall peaks do seem to me to add a dimension of time. Now if it were just possible to make the photos a thousand times larger!

    Like

    Comment by montucky — November 8, 2007 @ 9:51 am

  5. Beautiful! In the last picture it’s particularly apparent how big the backcountry really is.

    Like

    Comment by wolf — November 8, 2007 @ 11:20 am

  6. Incredible work Terry, you have definitely conveyed the beauty of your home with these shots. 🙂

    Like

    Comment by Bernie Kasper — November 8, 2007 @ 12:41 pm

  7. “And exactly why would knowing that even matter?”

    Stunningly profound thing to say, amidst stunningly pretty photographs. Nothing ever beats mountains and nature, in the glorification of this world’s existence. Absolutely nothing.
    The bare sights of God’s justifiable self beauty!

    Like

    Comment by narziss — November 8, 2007 @ 2:27 pm

  8. wolf,

    Yes, it is a big country, but large pieces of forest like this are necessary to keep the earth supplied with fresh water and clean air. I hate to see us waste even a square inch of it! I know Alaska has even larger areas that are still in pristine condition.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — November 8, 2007 @ 4:42 pm

  9. Bernie,

    Scenes like these are the reason why I spend so much time on the high trails and why, each time, I hate to go back down. Even though I have enjoyed this country over many, many years, it has never become tiresome of commonplace.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — November 8, 2007 @ 4:47 pm

  10. narziss,

    The mountains are very special places. I often think that being on these peaks a mile above the valleys takes one a thousand miles closer to God.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — November 8, 2007 @ 4:50 pm

  11. Terry, I am speechless.

    Like

    Comment by teaspoon — November 8, 2007 @ 7:20 pm

  12. teaspoon,

    I hope that’s a good thing!

    Like

    Comment by montucky — November 8, 2007 @ 10:39 pm


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